NUCL 3000: Nuclear Principles in Engineering and Science (3 cr.)
Nuclear principles in engineering and science will introduce students to fundamental concepts in nuclear engineering. Students will study the basics of nuclear energetics, radioactive decay, and radiation doses and hazards. The basic concepts will be used to introduce applications of nuclear technology including power, weapons, and medicine.
NUCL 3100: Radiation Interactions (3 cr.)
Radiation interactions will provide the students with a fundamental understanding of basic principles of radiation interactions with matter. These fundamental principles will then be applied to the life-cycle of neutrons in a reactor and the detection of radiation.
NUCL 3200: Radiochemistry (3 cr.)
Radiochemistry will introduce students to the fundamental models of the atom and a detailed understanding of nuclear structure. Fundamentals of radioactive decay, radiation interactions and radiation detection will be discussed. In addition, students will the learn the fundamentals of isotope production through reactors, accelerators and in stars.
NUCL 4000: Nuclear Laboratory (1 cr.)
In the Nuclear Laboratory, students will gain hands-on experience studying the fundamental interactions and detection of radionuclides. In addition, students will gain an introduction to science using the TRIGA reactor including: neutron activation analysis and methods for determining the profile of thermal flux in a reactor.
Nuclear-related technical electives (6 cr.)

The 6 credits of nuclear-related technical electives may include NUCL 6000-level courses1 or nuclear-related courses from a student’s home department.

Available NUCL 6000-level courses currently include:

  • NUCL 6030: Graduate Radiation Interactions  This course will provide students with a fundamental understanding of basic principles covering the modern theory of the atomic and nucleus structure, quantum description of nuclear processes, interactions of radiation with matter, and radioactive decay. Special emphasis will be placed on understanding the scattering and attenuation of neutrons, photons, and charge particles.
  • NUCL 6032: Graduate Radiochemistry Graduate Radiochemistry will teach students the fundamental properties of the actinides applied to the nuclear fuel cycle. Students will learn techniques ranging from the extraction of uranium from ores, to the production of materials for power reactors, to the long term storage of nuclear waste.
  • NUCL 6050: Reactor Physics This course will provide students with an overview of cross sections and fission processes to build a comprehensive understanding of reactor physics and its application to reactor design. The main focus of this course will be on the theory of reactor steady-state (normal) operation. Methods of neutron transport modeling will be explained: diffusion, method of characteristics, finite difference method, Sn, Pn. Some aspects of the reactor kinetics will be also introduced.
  • NUCL 6060: Reactor Operation and Regulatory Policy This course will cover the theory and operation of our TRIGA reactor. Students will be taught the U.S. NRC 10CFR code and other associated regulatory policies and rules. With practical experiences through the experimental procedures involving our TRIGA. This course will provide students with the opportunity to learn how to operate the research reactor. Successful completion of the course will enable students to pursue the Research Operator exam for operation of our TRIGA reactor.
  • NUCL 7220: Analytical Nuclear Forensics This course will cover the theory and operation of our TRIGA reactor. Students will be taught the U.S. NRC 10CFR code and other associated regulatory policies and rules. With practical experiences through the experimental procedures involving our TRIGA. This course will provide students with the opportunity to learn how to operate the research reactor. Successful completion of the course will enable students to pursue the Research Operator exam for operation of our TRIGA reactor.